Erroll garner - after midnight - Erroll Garner - After Midnight (Vinyl, LP, Album) at Discogs


And what is that "Garnerian manner?" Having had no formal training, Erroll Garner was not encumbered by theory or common performance practice, thereby making his music quite uncommon. Garner performed with a two-fisted orchestral style that was about as anti-Bud Powell as one could get. His left hand was as much a rhythmic instrument, as it was a harmonic one. Garner's astonishing free introductions, such as that for "I'll Remember April" were forged with his left hand. Garner's lack of formal education was his greatest asset. It enabled him to explore harmony and arrangement in a postmodern manner before there was postmodernism. Take Gershwin's "They Can't Take that Away from Me." Here, Garner deconstructs the Ellington tune in grand style, roaming around the mostly in the low keys before breaking about in the upper register. Garner transforms "April in Paris," with his ornate introduction and idiosyncratic approach to the melody. I would imagine Franz Liszt playing standards this way.

On March 14, 1955, Erroll Garner sat down at the piano and played one interesting solo after another, resulting in two albums of music. Seven pieces (all but "That Old Feeling" are taken as ballads) were originally released as Solitaire ; this CD reissue adds four additional selections that are taken at faster paces. Although not essential, this rhapsodic and occasionally wandering -- but always intriguing -- set should greatly interest fans.


Erroll Garner - After MidnightErroll Garner - After MidnightErroll Garner - After MidnightErroll Garner - After Midnight

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